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Monthly Archives:February 2016

Byadmin

6 FABULOUS BENEFITS OF SESAME OIL FOR THE BEAUTY OF YOUR SKIN AND HAIR

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Sesame seeds come from the Sesame plant, which is grown in Africa and some parts of India.

One of the oldest oilseed crops known to man, sesame seeds have one of the highest yields of oil of all of the oilseeds; the seeds are used extensively in cooking all around the world.

Sesame seed oil is full of ingredients that can provide many different health benefits and it can also be used in many ways, as a part of your beauty regime, having benefits for hair, skin and anti-aging properties.

Here are six of the beauty uses of sesame oil:

 

 

 

 

1. SUPPORTS HAIR HEALTH

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Using sesame seed oil as a hot oil treatment for your hair is known to help the growth of thick and shiny hair. Massage some warm sesame seed oil into your hair and scalp (make sure that the oil isn’t too hot) and the essential fatty acids, such as omega-3, omega-6 and omega-9 will nourish your hair and encourage new growth.  Sesame conditions hair and prevents split ends.

 

 

2. RICH IN VITAMIN E, SESAME OIL HAS ANTI-AGING PROPERTIES FOR SKIN

Sack of sesame seeds and glass bottle of oil on mat

Benefits of sesame oil are very numerous. Sesame seed oil is a great source of vitamin E, the antioxidant used in many commercially available anti-ageing creams. The vitamin E helps to fight the effects of free radicals, which are the main cause of premature ageing of the skin.

3. CAN REMOVE SKIN INFLAMMATION OR BLEMISHES

 

Sesame seed oil has anti-inflammatory and antibacterial properties, so it can be used as a treatment for skin conditions. Apply sesame oil before you go to bed at night and wash it off in the morning, and it will not only nourish and moisturize your skin, but also help fight blemishes and keep your skin clear and fresh looking.

 

 

4. IMPROVES SKIN ELASTICITY AND QUALITY

Spa Woman. Beautiful Girl Touching Her Face. Perfect Skin. Skincare. Young Skin

 

Another one of great benefits of sesame oil is that the oil is slightly thicker, than most other natural oils, which makes it ideal for all over body massaging and skin conditioning. Sesame seed oil is widely used in India, where it is said that a daily massage with the oil removes the toxins and pollution from the skin, provides a deep down moisturising effect and improves elasticity of the skin.

 

 

5. SPEEDS UP HEALING PROCESS, HELPS REDUCE SCARS

 

 

The vitamin E content and the antibacterial properties of sesame seed oil make it a good treatment for cuts and wounds. It promotes faster healing and it also reduces the appearance of scars on the skin.

 

 

6. TREATMENT FOR CRACKED HEELS AND ULTRA-DRY SKIN

two pairs of feet of children lying on the bed

 

Next one of the amazing benefits of sesame oil is that the oil can help soothe and heal cracked heels and dry hands. Apply the oil to your feet and hands, and massage it in before going to bed and then, leave the oil on, with a pair of socks and cosy gloves on to keep the oil off the bed sheets and the oil will penetrate deep into the skin to bring quick relief to dry and cracked skin, making it softer, smoother and younger.

 

There are also many health benefits of sesame oil that we didn’t include in this article, this is why people love cooking with sesame oil, but this is another topic…

 

 

Byadmin

12 Minutes of Yoga for Bone Health

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Yoga enthusiasts link the practice to a long list of health benefits, including greater flexibility and range of motion, stronger muscles, better posture and balance, reduced emotional and physical stress, and increased self-awareness and self-esteem.

 

 

But definitively proving these benefits is challenging, requiring years of costly research. A pharmaceutical company is unlikely to fund a study that doesn’t involve a drug, and in any event, the research requires a large group of volunteers tracked over a very long time.

 

 

The subjects must provide health measurements at the outset, learn the proper poses, continue to do them regularly for years and be regularly evaluated.

 

No one knows these challenges better than Dr. Loren M. Fishman, a physiatrist at Columbia University who specializes in rehabilitative medicine. For years, he has been gathering evidence on yoga and bone health, hoping to determine whether yoga might be an effective therapy for osteoporosis.

 

 

The idea is not widely accepted in the medical community, but then, researchers know comparatively little about complementary medicine in general. So in 2005, Dr. Fishman began a small pilot study of yoga moves that turned up some encouraging results. Eleven practitioners had increased bone density in their spine and hips, he reported in 2009, compared with seven controls who did not practice yoga.

Yoga on beach barefoot

 

Knowing that more than 700,000 spinal fractures and more than 300,000 hip fractures occur annually in the United States, Dr. Fishman hoped that similar findings from a much larger study might convince doctors that this low-cost and less dangerous alternative to bone-loss drugs is worth pursuing.

 

 

Those medications can produce adverse side effects like gastrointestinal distress and fractures of the femur.

Indeed, a recent study published in Clinical Interventions in Aging found that among 126,188 women found to have osteoporosis, all of whom had Medicare Part D drug coverage, only 28 percent started bone drug therapy within a year of diagnosis.

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Many of those who avoided drugs were trying to avoid gastrointestinal problems.

 

 

On the other hand, yoga’s “side effects,” Dr. Fishman and colleagues wrote recently, “include better posture, improved balance, enhanced coordination, greater range of motion, higher strength, reduced levels of anxiety and better gait.”

Weight-bearing activity is often recommended to patients with bone loss, and Dr. Fishman argues that certain yoga positions fit the bill.

 

 

“Yoga puts more pressure on bone than gravity does,” he said in an interview. “By opposing one group of muscles against another, it stimulates osteocytes, the bone-making cells.”

Most experts argue that it’s difficult, perhaps impossible, for adults to gain significant bone mass. Undeterred, Dr. Fishman invested a chunk of his own money and with three collaborators — Yi-Hsueh Lu of The Rockefeller University, Bernard Rosner of Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and Dr. Gregory Chang of New York University — solicited volunteers worldwide via the Internet for a follow-up to his small pilot study.

 

women doing stretching exercise

Of the 741 people who joined his experiment from 2005 to 2015, 227 (202 of them women) followed through with doing the 12 assigned yoga poses daily or at least every other day. The average age of the 227 participants upon joining the study was 68, and 83 percent had osteoporosis or its precursor, osteopenia.

 

 

The 12 poses, by their English names, were tree, triangle, warrior II, side-angle, twisted triangle, locust, bridge, supine hand-to-foot I, supine hand-to-foot II, straight-legged twist, bent-knee twist and corpse pose. Each pose was held for 30 seconds. The daily regimen, once learned, took 12 minutes to complete.

 

 

The researchers collected data at the start of the study on the participants’ bone density measurements, blood and urine chemistry and X-rays of their spines and hips. They were each given a DVD of the 12 yoga poses used in the pilot study and an online program in which to record what they did and how often.

 

 

A decade after the start of the study, bone density measurements were again taken and emailed to the researchers; many participants also had repeat X-rays done. The findings, as reported last month in Topics of Geriatric Rehabilitation, showed improved bone density in the spine and femur of the 227 participants who were moderately or fully compliant with the assigned yoga exercises.

 

 

Improvements were seen in bone density in the hip as well, but they were not statistically significant.

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Before the study, the participants had had 109 fractures, reported by them or found on X-rays.

 

 

At the time the study was submitted for publication, “with more than 90,000 hours of yoga practiced largely by people with osteoporosis or osteopenia, there have been no reported or X-ray detected fractures or serious injuries of any kind related to the practice of yoga in any of the 741 participants,” Dr. Fishman and his colleagues wrote.

 

 

“Yoga looks like it’s safe, even for people who have suffered significant bone loss,” Dr. Fishman said in an interview.

 

 

Furthermore, a special study of bone quality done on 18 of the participants showed that they had “better internal support of their bones, which is not measured by a bone density scan but is important to resisting fractures,” Dr. Fishman said.

 

 

The study has many limitations, including the use of self-selected volunteers and the lack of a control group. But all told, the team concluded, the results may lend support to Dr. Fishman’s long-held belief that yoga can help reverse bone loss.

 

 

Even if bone density did not increase, improvements in posture and balance that can accrue from the practice of yoga can be protective, Dr. Fishman said.

Beautiful brunette lady in wheat field at sunset

 

“Spinal fractures can result from poor posture, and there’s no medication for that, but yoga is helpful,” he said.

 

 

In addition, “Yoga is good for range of motion, strength, coordination and reduced anxiety,” he said, “all of which contribute to the ability to stay upright and not fall. If you don’t fall, you greatly reduce your risk of a serious fracture.”